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FAQ

  • Does an immobilizer defeat affect performance software / tune that is on the ECU?
No, the ECU's immobilizer programming is stored on a separate chip (called the EEPROM) from the chip where the tune is stored (called the FLASH). A backup of both chips is made when first being serviced to be used to validate the programming changes made.
  • Will the vehicle experience any side effects from the immobilizer defeat?
In most cases there will be no side effects after the immobilizer defeat is performed. Some specific situations and their effects will be listed below.
- Immobilizer still seems to be active: This is extremely rare but can be caused by immobilizer system related error codes (DTCs) still stored on either the ECU or Instrument Cluster. To resolve this, simply use an OBD diagnostic scanner and fully reset any codes stored on both modules.
- Any situation where the chip in the key is not recognized by the instrument cluster: This will cause the immobilizer light on the instrument cluster to continuously flash as if the immo system was still activated. This is due to the way VW/Audi designed the immobilizer system. Even after the immo defeat is performed, the instrument cluster continues to check to see if it recognizes the chip in the key being used. If it does not (i.e. unknown, damaged or missing chip or pick-up antenna), then the light will flash.
- Audi B6 models are unsupported due to continuously flashing Hazard Lights after the immobilizer defeat: All Audi B6 Models (2000-2006), and part numbers: 8E0 909 518 XX8E0 909 559 XX. There have also been reported issues with climate control afterwards as well.
  • How long is your average service turnaround time?

ECU coding/flashing services: Our turnaround time tends to be from the next day up to two business days from the time that we receive your instrument cluster. 

Instrument cluster coding/flashing services: Our turnaround time tends to be from the next day up to two business days from the time that we receive your instrument cluster. 

Instrument cluster color conversions, repairs, and other services: Our turnaround time tends to be from the next day up to five business days from the time that we receive your cluster depending on how much work is being done or availability of parts (we will notify you way in advance if there is any issue with part availability). 
  • Will you accept local drop-off orders?
We only accept mailed in orders. No exceptions. 
  • Will you accept international orders?

Of course we will! All international order are welcome as long as we can arrange proper shipping with you. Shipping charges to Canada should be correctly calculated by default at checkout. Others may need custom shipping set by us. Please contact us with any questions about international orders.

  • Do you require a core unit for services?
No, we do not have any core requirements with our services.
  • Do I receive my exact same ECU / Cluster / Module back?
Absolutely! For any of our mail-in modification services you will always receive your exact same unit back unless otherwise required by your order requests. e.g. Sending in a fried ECU to have it cloned to a functioning replacement.

VAR Parts is happy to provide you with a 3 month limited warranty on all services and parts that we provide.

  • Does this void my vehicle's warranty?

We would recommend that you assume any services and modifications we provide will void your vehicle's warranty. With that said, please take a look at the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act of 1975. Basically, the act states that a dealer must prove that aftermarket equipment caused the need for repairs before it can deny warranty coverage.

  • Is it illegal to change the mileage?

It is only illegal to change your instrument cluster's mileage if you are attempting to misrepresent the mileage in any way. We here at VAR Parts do our best to take each mileage adjustment customer is informed of this and fills out a waiver indicating that they understand this.

  • What is an immobilizer?
Your vehicle's immobilizer is a security feature that makes it more difficult for your car to be stolen. It prevents a car from being "hot wired" after entry into the vehicle has been achieved.
Immobilizer Versions
IMMO I & II - Key chip and Cluster immobilizer info needs to match for vehicle to start.
IMMO III - Key chip, Cluster and ECU immobilizer info needs to match for vehicle to start.
Immobilizer II Matching Procedures:
For information on performing an instrument cluster swap check out Ross-Tech's Immobilizer II Immobilizer Swapping (Instrument Cluster) procedure.
For information on matching keys to a new or used instrument cluster check out Ross-Tech's Immobilizer II Key Matching (Cluster) procedure.
Immobilizer III Matching Procedures: 
For information on performing an instrument cluster swap check out Ross-Tech's Immobilizer III Immobilizer Swapping (Instrument Cluster) procedure.
For information on matching keys to a new or used instrument cluster check out Ross-Tech's Immobilizer III Key Matching (Cluster) procedure.
For information on performing an ECU swap check out Ross-Tech's Immobilizer III ECU Swapping procedure.
"Immo Delete" - An immobilizer delete or "immo delete" is commonly used to allow for an easier replacement of the ECU or instrument cluster. The ECU is recoded to not check for any immobilizer info and will allow the car to start without any immobilizer matching needing to be done. Your keys will still need to be paired if swapping the instrument cluster or else you will have a flashing immobilizer light (car will start regardless).
"SKC" - Your vehicle's SKC is used in Ross-Tech's VCDS software to do higher level security procedures (e.g. instrument cluster, key, and ECU immobilizer matching).
More Information about Immobilizers for VW and Audi - Check out Ross-Tech's wiki!
  • How is an immobilizer defeat performed?
Depending on the model type of the ECU, an immobilizer defeat can be performed in a few different ways. A very generalized summary is listed below. Feel free to contact us if you have any specific questions about your model.
- Late 90's to early 00's (Bosch ME5.9 and some ME7.1): Immobilizer defeat is typically performed by desoldering the EEPROM, modifying the necessary immobilizer programming, and re-installing the EEPROM chip.
- Early 00's to late 00's (Bosch ME7.5 and EDC15): Immobilizer defeat is typically performed by connecting to the ECU using our in-house developed programming module using the ECU's built-in connectors. We then read, modify, and write back the necessary immobilizer programming changes.
- Late 00's and later (Bosch MED9.1 and EDC16): Immobilizer defeat is typically performed by connecting to the ECU using the ECU's built-in BDM interface. We then read, modify, and write back the necessary immobilizer programming changes.